The Cold War: What Do “We Now Know”?

@article{Leffler1999TheCW,
  title={The Cold War: What Do “We Now Know”?},
  author={M. Leffler},
  journal={The American Historical Review},
  year={1999},
  volume={104},
  pages={501-524}
}
  • M. Leffler
  • Published 1999
  • Political Science
  • The American Historical Review
DURING THE LAST FEW YEARS, we have had a spate of important new books, articles, and essays reinterpreting the Cold War. Many of them have been based on new documents and memoirs from the former Soviet Union and the People's Republic of China as well as from European governments on both sides of the Iron Curtain. The books are provocative and insightful. They focus attention on the role of ideology and the importance of culture. They illuminate the complex interactions within the American and… Expand
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