The Classification of the Uto-Aztecan Languages Based on Lexical Evidence

@article{Miller1984TheCO,
  title={The Classification of the Uto-Aztecan Languages Based on Lexical Evidence},
  author={W. R. Miller},
  journal={International Journal of American Linguistics},
  year={1984},
  volume={50},
  pages={1 - 24}
}
  • W. R. Miller
  • Published 1984
  • Sociology
  • International Journal of American Linguistics
0. Introduction. There has been a notable lack of agreement among informed scholars on the classification of the Uto-Aztecan languages. The problem revolves around the family-tree approach versus the wave or mesh approach (see Bloomfield 1933:311-18 and Swadesh 1959). The family-tree approach assumes sudden splits within a dialect-free parent, while the wave approach assumes a dialect continuum which dissolves into distinct languages and in which the newly budded languages reflect the earlier… Expand
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A Note on Extinct Languages of Northwest Mexico of Supposed Uto-Aztecan Affiliation
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A number of languages in northwest Mexico, for which we have little or no linguistic data, became extinct in the early colonial period. Most of the extant languages in this area are Uto-Aztecan, andExpand
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