The City of the Great Singer: C. R. Ashbee’s Jerusalem

@article{Rapaport2007TheCO,
  title={The City of the Great Singer: C. R. Ashbee’s Jerusalem},
  author={Raquel Rapaport},
  journal={Architectural History},
  year={2007},
  volume={50},
  pages={171 - 210}
}
The eminent British architect, designer and educator Charles Robert Ashbee (1863–1942) lived and worked in Jerusalem from 1918 to 1922, as Civic Adviser to the City of Jerusalem and principal officer of the Pro-Jerusalem Society. This proved to be a busy and fruitful period in his late career. Back in England sixteen years later, following a final visit to Palestine, Ashbee compiled his Jerusalem Collection, assembling and classifying all the research and planning material he had collected and… Expand

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