The Church of England, c. 1689-c. 1833 : from toleration to Tractarianism

@article{Walsh1993TheCO,
  title={The Church of England, c. 1689-c. 1833 : from toleration to Tractarianism},
  author={John Walsh and Colin M. Haydon and Stephen Taylor},
  journal={Albion: A Quarterly Journal Concerned with British Studies},
  year={1993},
  volume={27},
  pages={128}
}
1. Introduction: The Church and Anglicanism in the long 'eighteenth century' John Walsh and Stephen Taylor Part I. The Pastoral Work of the Church: 2. The eighteenth-century Reformation: the pastoral task of Anglican clergy after 1689 Jeremy Gregory 3. The clergy in the diocese of London in the eighteenth century Viviane Barrie-Curien 4. The reception of Richard Podmore: Anglicanism in Saddleworth 1700-1830 Mark Smith Part II. Crisis and Reform: 5. The Church, the societies, and the moral… 
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