The Cerebellum Contributes to Somatosensory Cortical Activity during Self-Produced Tactile Stimulation

@article{Blakemore1999TheCC,
  title={The Cerebellum Contributes to Somatosensory Cortical Activity during Self-Produced Tactile Stimulation},
  author={S. J. Blakemore and Daniel M. Wolpert and Chris D. Frith},
  journal={NeuroImage},
  year={1999},
  volume={10},
  pages={448-459}
}
We used fMRI to examine neural responses when subjects experienced a tactile stimulus that was either self-produced or externally produced. The somatosensory cortex showed increased levels of activity when the stimulus was externally produced. In the cerebellum there was less activity associated with a movement that generated a tactile stimulus than with a movement that did not. This difference suggests that the cerebellum is involved in predicting the specific sensory consequences of movements… 

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