The Central Commission for Navigation on the Rhine, 1815-1914. Nineteenth Century European Integration.

@inproceedings{Klemann2017TheCC,
  title={The Central Commission for Navigation on the Rhine, 1815-1914. Nineteenth Century European Integration.},
  author={Hein A. M. Klemann},
  year={2017}
}
: Traditionally, local rulers and towns along the Rhine taxed Rhine shipping, regulated and monopolized it, and so caused an almost prohibitive increase in costs. Only the French liberalized Rhine navigation and limited tolls and taxes on barging during the final years of the 18 th century. After the fall of Napoleon, it was feared that the old approach would return. As no one thought this was a good idea, the Conference of Vienna tried to regulate navigation on international rivers in general… 

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