The Center Still Holds: Liberal Internationalism Survives

@article{Chaudoin2010TheCS,
  title={The Center Still Holds: Liberal Internationalism Survives},
  author={Stephen Chaudoin and Helen V. Milner and Dustin Tingley},
  journal={International Security},
  year={2010},
  volume={35},
  pages={75-94}
}
Recent research, including an article by Charles Kupchan and Peter Trubowitz in this journal, has argued that the United States' long-standing foreign policy orientation of liberal internationalism has been in serious decline because of rising domestic partisan divisions. A reanalysis of the theoretical logic driving these arguments and the empirical evidence used to support them suggests a different conclusion. Extant evidence on congressional roll call voting and public opinion surveys, which… Expand
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