The Census-Taker Problem

@article{Meyers1990TheCP,
  title={The Census-Taker Problem},
  author={L. Meyers and R. See},
  journal={Mathematics Magazine},
  year={1990},
  volume={63},
  pages={86-88}
}
A census taker comes to a two-family house. After obtaining the required information from a downstairs resident, the census taker asks, "Does anyone live upstairs?" "Yes, but everyone is out now. However, I can supply you with the necessary information." "How many people live upstairs?" "Three." " What are their ages, to last birthday?" "Well," the downstairs resident answers in puzzle-ese, "the product of their ages is 1296, and the sum of their ages is the house number, which you already know… Expand
1 Citations
Revisiting a Number-Theoretic Puzzle: The Census-Taker Problem
The current work revisits the results of L.F. Meyers and R. See in [3], and presents the census-taker problem as a motivation to introduce the beautiful theory of numbers.

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