The Celestial Sign in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle in the 770s: Insights on Contemporary Solar Activity

@article{Hayakawa2019TheCS,
  title={The Celestial Sign in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle in the 770s: Insights on Contemporary Solar Activity},
  author={Hisashi Hayakawa and Francis Richard Stephenson and Yuta Uchikawa and Yusuke Ebihara and Chris J. Scott and Matthew N. Wild and J. Wilkinson and David M. Willis},
  journal={Solar Physics},
  year={2019},
  volume={294},
  pages={1-30}
}
The anomalous concentration of radiocarbon in 774/775 attracted intense discussion on its origin, including the possible extreme solar event(s) exceeding any events in observational history. Anticipating such extreme solar events, auroral records were also surveyed in historical documents and those including the red celestial sign after sunset in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle (ASC) were subjected to consideration. Usoskin et al. (Astron. Astrophys. 55, L3, 2013: U13) interpreted this record as an… 

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TLDR
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