The Causes of Errors in Clinical Reasoning: Cognitive Biases, Knowledge Deficits, and Dual Process Thinking

@article{Norman2017TheCO,
  title={The Causes of Errors in Clinical Reasoning: Cognitive Biases, Knowledge Deficits, and Dual Process Thinking},
  author={Geoffrey R Norman and Sandra Monteiro and Jonathan Sherbino and Jonathan S Ilgen and Henk G. Schmidt and S{\'i}lvia Mamede},
  journal={Academic Medicine},
  year={2017},
  volume={92},
  pages={23–30}
}
Contemporary theories of clinical reasoning espouse a dual processing model, which consists of a rapid, intuitive component (Type 1) and a slower, logical and analytical component (Type 2). Although the general consensus is that this dual processing model is a valid representation of clinical reasoning, the causes of diagnostic errors remain unclear. Cognitive theories about human memory propose that such errors may arise from both Type 1 and Type 2 reasoning. Errors in Type 1 reasoning may be… 
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