The Causes of China’s Great Leap Famine, 1959–1961*

@article{Kung2003TheCO,
  title={The Causes of China’s Great Leap Famine, 1959–1961*},
  author={James Kai-sing Kung and Justin J. Y. Lin},
  journal={Economic Development and Cultural Change},
  year={2003},
  volume={52},
  pages={51 - 73}
}
With a population of roughly 660 million in 1958, the year marking the origin of this famine, 30 million amounted to a loss of close to 5% of the country’s population. 4 Moreover, the loss of lives of this magnitude occurred within an incredibly short period of time; within 2 years the country’s death rate was doubled from slightly below 12 per thousand in 1958 to 25 per thousand in 1960, making it “the worst famine in human history.” 5 
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