The Cape Peninsula, South Africa: physiographical, biological and historical background to an extraordinary hot-spot of biodiversity

@article{Cowling2004TheCP,
  title={The Cape Peninsula, South Africa: physiographical, biological and historical background to an extraordinary hot-spot of biodiversity},
  author={Richard M. Cowling and I. A. W. Macdonald and Mark Trevor Simmons},
  journal={Biodiversity \& Conservation},
  year={2004},
  volume={5},
  pages={527-550}
}
The Cape Peninsula, a 470 km2 area of rugged scenery and varied climate, is located at the southwestern tip of the Cape Floristic Region, South Africa. The Peninsula is home to 2285 plant species and is a globally important hot-spot of biodiversity for higher plants and invertebrates. This paper provides a broad overview of the physiography, biological attributes and history of human occupation of the Peninsula. The Peninsula is characterized physiographically by extremely high topographical… 
Why is the Cape Peninsula so rich in plant species? An analysis of the independent diversity components
TLDR
High beta diversity, encompassing almost complete turnover, was recorded along soil fertility gradients, and future research should focus on developing a biological and ecological understanding of the different forms of rarity and integrating this into management plans for the maintenance of biodiversity.
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Fynbos had a higher beta diversity of epigaeic invertebrates than forests, so the conservation of as much of the disturbed and fragmented lower elevations as soon as possible is needed.
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A total of 322 records were available from the literature on faunal taxa endemic to the Cape Peninsula, South Africa. Excluding possible pseudoendemics, dubious records and many invertebrate groups
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TLDR
Conservation of a variety of elevations, including steep and flat areas, all aspects of mountains, as well as both the wet and dry areas, overall will contribute to the conservation of the insects.
Profiling a besieged flora: endemic and threatened plants of the Cape Peninsula, South Africa
TLDR
The habitat and biological profiles of both endemic and threatened species suggest that they are highly vulnerable to extinction as a result of increasing rates of alien plant infestation, urbanization and inappropriate fire regimes.
Cape Floral Region Protected Areas, South Africa
The Cape Floral Region in South Africa is one of the richest areas for plants in the world and one of the world’s great centers of terrestrial biodiversity. It represents less than 0.5% of the area
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The biodiversity of the Cape Peninsula (49127 ha in extent) has been considerably affected by various factors since European settlement in 1652. Urbanization and agriculture have transformed 37% of
Significant variables for the conservation of mountain invertebrates
Conserving biodiversity on mountains holds particular challenges, with topographic species beta diversity being high. In turn, conserving mountain biodiversity in the heart of a biodiversity hotspot,
Conservation of invertebrate biodiversity on a mountain in a global biodiversity hotspot, Cape Floral Region
Mountains present particular challenges for biodiversity conservation. Table Mountain is a significant mountain in a global biodiversity hotspot, the Cape Floristic Region. It has outstanding
Fire Geography and Urbanisation on the Cape Peninsula
The rich flora of the Cape Peninsula has evolved in the context of a complex mountainous topography formed over millennia by a range of geological processes, of a winter-rainfall summer-drought
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Why is the Cape Peninsula so rich in plant species? An analysis of the independent diversity components
TLDR
High beta diversity, encompassing almost complete turnover, was recorded along soil fertility gradients, and future research should focus on developing a biological and ecological understanding of the different forms of rarity and integrating this into management plans for the maintenance of biodiversity.
Faunal diversity and endemicity of the Cape Peninsula, South Africa — a first assessment
A total of 322 records were available from the literature on faunal taxa endemic to the Cape Peninsula, South Africa. Excluding possible pseudoendemics, dubious records and many invertebrate groups
Profiling a besieged flora: endemic and threatened plants of the Cape Peninsula, South Africa
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The habitat and biological profiles of both endemic and threatened species suggest that they are highly vulnerable to extinction as a result of increasing rates of alien plant infestation, urbanization and inappropriate fire regimes.
Current and future threats to plant biodiversity on the Cape Peninsula, South Africa
The biodiversity of the Cape Peninsula (49127 ha in extent) has been considerably affected by various factors since European settlement in 1652. Urbanization and agriculture have transformed 37% of
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