The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (review)

@article{Culicover2004TheCG,
  title={The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (review)},
  author={Peter W. Culicover},
  journal={Language},
  year={2004},
  volume={80},
  pages={127 - 141}
}
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