The Burning of Captives in the Assyrian Royal Inscriptions, and Early Neo-Assyrian Conceptions of the Other

@article{Dewar2021TheBO,
  title={The Burning of Captives in the Assyrian Royal Inscriptions, and Early Neo-Assyrian Conceptions of the Other},
  author={Benjamin Neil Dewar},
  journal={Studia Orientalia Electronica},
  year={2021}
}
  • B. Dewar
  • Published 30 December 2021
  • History
  • Studia Orientalia Electronica
This paper is a study of the topos of the king burning captives in the Assyrian royal inscriptions. This punishment is notable for both its rarity and its cruelty, being the only time that the royal inscriptions describe violence towards children. I approach this topic in terms of Donald Black’s model of social control, in which the form and severity of social control, including violence, varies in relation to the “social geometry” that separates the parties involved in a dispute or conflict. I… 

Tables from this paper

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 78 REFERENCES
Representations of rebellion in the Assyrian royal inscriptions
This dissertation is a study of the literary motifs and topoi relating to rebellion in the Assyrian royal inscriptions. It is particularly concerned with the ways in which the Assyrian kings and
The Royal Inscriptions of Esarhaddon, King of Assyria (680-669 Bc)
The Royal Inscription of Esarhaddon, King of Assyria (680-669 BC) is the inaugural volume of the Royal Inscriptions of the Neo-Assyrian Period Project. The volume provides reliable, up-to-date
The Amarna letters
An ancient inscription identified a ruin at el Amarna as "the place of the letters of the Pharaoh." Discovered there, in about 1887, were nearly four hundred cuneiform tablets containing
The Fiery Furnace in the Book of Daniel and the Ancient near East
The court tales of Daniel 1-6 are all set in the Eastern diaspora. Daniel and his three friends, Hananiah, Mishael, and Azariah, are four Jewish youths taken to Babylon by Nebuchadnezzar to serve at
Annals of the Kings of Assyria: the Cuneiform Texts, with Translations, Transliterations, &c, from the original documents in the British Museum
IT is an interesting fact that practically all the materials which exist for the reconstruction of the ancient history of Mesopotamia are to be found within the walls of the British Museum. Neither
The royal inscriptions of Tiglath-pileser III (744-727 BC) and Shalmaneser V (726-722 BC), kings of Assyria
The Royal Inscriptions of Tiglath-pileser III (744–727 BC) and Shalmaneser V (726–722 BC), Kings of Assyria (Royal Inscriptions of the Neo-Assyrian Period 1) carries on where the Assyrian Periods
Gesture and Alterity in the Art of Ashurnasirpal II
The narrative scenes carved in low relief on the massive stone slabs that decorated the palaces of first-millennium b.c.e. Assyrian kings in northern Mesopotamia participated in the construction of
The Babylonian Background of the Motif of the Fiery Furnace in Daniel 3
The third chapter of the book of Daniel forms a richly textured narrative, often ascribed to the genre of the court legend.1 The royal order to worship the golden image, the refusal of the three
My Brother’s Keeper: Assurbanipal versus Šamaš-šuma-ukīn
  • Shana Zaia
  • History
    Journal of Ancient Near Eastern History
  • 2018
Abstract When Esarhaddon named his successors, he split the empire between two of his sons, with Assurbanipal as king of Assyria and Šamaš-šuma-ukīn as king of Babylonia. This arrangement functioned
The Aramaeans: Their Ancient History, Culture, Religion
In order to present the Aramean history during some six hundred years, down to the seventh century B.C., it was necessary to analyze a wide range of sources, mainly cuneiform, epigraphic, and
...
...