The Burgess Shale Anomalocaridid Hurdia and Its Significance for Early Euarthropod Evolution

@article{Daley2009TheBS,
  title={The Burgess Shale Anomalocaridid Hurdia and Its Significance for Early Euarthropod Evolution},
  author={Allison C. Daley and Graham E. Budd and Jean‐Bernard Caron and Gregory D. Edgecombe and Desmond Collins},
  journal={Science},
  year={2009},
  volume={323},
  pages={1597 - 1600}
}
As the largest predators of the Cambrian seas, the anomalocaridids had an important impact in structuring the first complex marine animal communities, but many aspects of anomalocaridid morphology, diversity, ecology, and affinity remain unclear owing to a paucity of specimens. Here we describe the anomalocaridid Hurdia, based on several hundred specimens from the Burgess Shale in Canada. Hurdia possesses a general body architecture similar to those of Anomalocaris and Laggania, including the… 
Morphology and systematics of the anomalocaridid arthropod Hurdia from the Middle Cambrian of British Columbia and Utah
In Cambrian fossil Lagerstätten like the Burgess Shale, exceptionally preserved arthropods constitute a large part of the taxonomic diversity, providing opportunities to study the early evolution of
A giant Ordovician anomalocaridid
TLDR
Phylogenetic analyses support a position of anomalocaridids in the arthropod stem, as a sister group to the euarthropods, and confirm the presence of a dorsal array of flexible blades attached to a transverse rachis on the trunk segments.
New anomalocaridid appendages from the Burgess Shale, Canada
Abstract:  The complex history of description of the anomalocaridids has partly been caused by the fragmentary nature of these fossils. Frontal appendages and mouth parts are more readily preserved
The oral cone of Anomalocaris is not a classic ‘‘peytoia’’
TLDR
It is shown that Anomalocaris has a different oral cone, with only three large plates and a variable number of smaller and medium plates, which suggests that suction, rather than biting, was used for food ingestion, and that anomalies in general employed a range of different scavenging and predatory feeding strategies.
A morphological and taxonomic appraisal of the oldest anomalocaridid from the Lower Cambrian of Poland
Abstract Material previously referred to as Cassubia infercambriensis was re-examined and found to represent a composite fossil of a Peytoia-like anomalocaridid frontal appendage and an arthropod of
Morphology of Anomalocaris canadensis from the Burgess Shale
TLDR
It is shown that Anomalocaris canadensis is critical for understanding the functional morphology of the group as a whole and corroborating its arthropod affinities, and some of these structures have not been identified in other anomalocaridids.
A Possible Anomalocaridid from the Cambrian Sirius Passet Lagerstätte, North Greenland
TLDR
It is described for the first time an appendage with possible anomalocaridid affinities as suggested by an overall gross morphology similar to that of the frontal appendage of Anomalocaris from other localitites.
A new hurdiid radiodont from the Burgess Shale evinces the exploitation of Cambrian infaunal food sources
TLDR
Cambroraster illuminates the evolution of Hurdiidae and evinces the exploitation of the diversifying infauna by these large and specialized nektobenthic carnivores in the aftermath of the Cambrian explosion.
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