The Bruce Effect: An Evaluation of Male/Female Advantages

@article{Schwagmeyer1979TheBE,
  title={The Bruce Effect: An Evaluation of Male/Female Advantages},
  author={Patricia L. Schwagmeyer},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={1979},
  volume={114},
  pages={932 - 938}
}
Pregnancy Blocking in Rodents: Adaptive Advantages for Females
  • J. Labov
  • Biology
  • The American Naturalist
  • 1981
TLDR
Arguments are presented here that pregnancy blocking may have actually evolved as a female mechanism to minimize parental investment in offspring which are potentially susceptible to infanticide by the strange male. Expand
Pregnancy Block from a Female Perspective
TLDR
Consideration of potential female benefits and the implications of female advantage in pregnancy block suggest that this behaviour could evolve with little or no reference to male advantage, and may represent a potential reproductive cost to stud males. Expand
Exposure to strange adults does not cause pregnancy disruption or infanticide in the gray-tailed vole
TLDR
It is concluded that neither the Bruce effect nor infanticide occurred differentially as a consequence of the treatments in gray-tailed voles, and field verification is recommended for other species of murid rodents that exhibit theBruce effect before the results are applied to evolutionary theory. Expand
Pregnancy block in laboratory mice as a function of male social status.
  • U. Huck
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of reproduction and fertility
  • 1982
TLDR
The hypothesis that dominant male laboratory mice would be more effective in inducing pregnancy blockage than would subordinate males is tested and the possibility that pregnancy block would be less likely to occur in females impregnation by dominant males than in those impregnated by subordinates is tested. Expand
Contrasting effects of male immigration and rainfall on rank-related patterns of miscarriage in female olive baboons.
TLDR
Using 30 years of data on wild olive baboons in Gombe National Park, Tanzania, there is evidence that rapidly-rising immigrant males induced miscarriages in high-ranking females outside of drought conditions, but miscarriage rates were largely reversed during prolonged periods of low rainfall, suggesting that low- ranking females are particularly vulnerable to low food availability and social instability. Expand
When will the Bruce effect evolve? The roles of infanticide, feticide and maternal death
TLDR
A quantitative model is presented that seeks to explain under what conditions females will be selected to exhibit the Bruce effect (i.e. to block or terminate pregnancy) rather than risking future infanticide or feticide. Expand
Data quality and the comparative method: the case of pregnancy failure in rodents
TLDR
This work compiled data on the Bruce effect, infanticide, and paternal care from one particularly rich source of information, rodents, but found the data set to be less rich than expected and found no clear relationship among the traits. Expand
When more is not merrier: Using wild population dynamics to understand the effect of density on ex situ seahorse mating behaviors
TLDR
Interpreting ex situ reproductive behaviors of seahorses within various densities reported from natural populations will help to predict the impact of conservation efforts and increase the likelihood of long-term persistence of populations for this threatened genus. Expand
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References

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Olfactory stimuli in mammalian reproduction.
In the article "Olfactory stimuli in mammalian reproduction," by A. S. Parkes and H. M. Bruce [ Science 134, 1049 (1961)], the acknowledgement (p. 1054, reference 31) should have read: "It is aExpand
Factors in pregnancy blocking: age and reproductive background of females: numbers of strange males.
TLDR
Pregnancy blocking experiments involving 731 female laboratory mice indicate an increased resistance among older females; an equal susceptibility among parous and non-parous females; and a lower pregnancy rate among females exposed to six males than those exposed to one or three males. Expand
Evidence of pregnancy failure in the wild meadow vole, Microtus pennsylvanicus.
TLDR
It seems reasonable to hypothesize that pregnancy failure is one of the density-dependent factors that decreases reproductivity in populations with a higher density. Expand
Sociobiology: the new synthesis?
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The Langurs of Abu: Female and Male Strategies of Reproduction
TLDR
"The Langurs of Abu" is the first book to analyze behavior of wild primates from the standpoint of both sexes, and is also a poignant and sophisticated exploration of primate behavior patterns from a feminist point of view. Expand
10 – Olfaction and Reproductive Behavior in Microtine Rodents
Levels of Aggression in Fluctuating Populations of the Prairie Vole, Microtus ochrogaster, in Eastern Kansas
TLDR
Levels of aggression, as seen through wounding, were examined throughout a density cycle of the prairie vole, Microtus ochrogaster, in eastern Kansas to propose a model of population regulation based on the observed patterns of wounding. Expand
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