The British reaction to dementia praecox 1893-1913. Part 1

@article{Ion2002TheBR,
  title={The British reaction to dementia praecox 1893-1913. Part 1},
  author={R. Ion and M. D. Beer},
  journal={History of Psychiatry},
  year={2002},
  volume={13},
  pages={285 - 304}
}
Emil Kraepelin introduced the concept of dementia praecox in 1893. The eventual acceptance of the concept brought a degree of clarity and order previously unknown to psychiatric nosology. The pre-Kraepelin era had been dominated by concepts such as mania, melancholia and adolescent insanity. After Kraepelin these ideas were abandoned in favour of the two great concepts of dementia praecox and manic depressive insanity, both of which remain active within modern psychiatry in the fonn of… Expand
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