The British reaction to dementia praecox 1893-1913. Part 2

@article{Ion2002TheBR,
  title={The British reaction to dementia praecox 1893-1913. Part 2},
  author={R. Ion and M. D. Beer},
  journal={History of Psychiatry},
  year={2002},
  volume={13},
  pages={419 - 431}
}
Part 1 of this study described the backdrop to the development of Kraepelin's ideas on dementia praecox and examined the response to the concept in the British psychiatric textbooks and journals of the period. Part 2 now explores the reaction to the concept in the professional meetings of the period, held by the British Medical Association (BMA) and the Medico-Psychological Association (MPA) during the years 1893 to 1913. In addition, it examines and evaluates the main issues and conclusions… Expand
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