The British People and the League of Nations: Democracy, Citizenship and Internationalism, c. 1918–45

@article{Corthorn2012TheBP,
  title={The British People and the League of Nations: Democracy, Citizenship and Internationalism, c. 1918–45},
  author={Paul Corthorn},
  journal={Contemporary British History},
  year={2012},
  volume={26},
  pages={560 - 561}
}
  • Paul Corthorn
  • Published 2012
  • Political Science
  • Contemporary British History
led to most of the weaker sentences being reworked. The errors range from trivial typos such as ‘Sydney Tarrow’ (p. 17) to a serious misrepresentation of ‘Bloody Sunday’ as an ‘intense battle’ fought out among ‘protesters’ and ‘troops’ (p. 75). The poor prose hits bottom with: ‘After two days in vibrant London, the ladies departed from St. Pancras station and arrived in Nottingham just in time to spend a delightful evening with their hostesses’ (p. 144). These flaws are not fatal. Although it… Expand

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Guarantee of Peace: The League of Nations in British Policy 1914-1925
Polson-Newman, ‘The League of Nations Union’, The English Review (May 1929), 579, quoted in Lorna Lloyd, Peace through Law; Britain and the International Court in the 1920s (Woodbridge, Suffolk
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The League of Nations Union 1918–1945
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For centrism in the early post-war period see Kenneth O. Morgan, Consensus and Disunity: The Lloyd George Coalition Government
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Its continuing relevance was recently reaffirmed by Martin Ceadel : 'The origins and Covenant of the League of Nations: a corrective to two standard simplifications
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