The Bright Side of Stress-Induced Eating

@article{Sproesser2014TheBS,
  title={The Bright Side of Stress-Induced Eating},
  author={Gudrun Sproesser and Harald Thomas Schupp and Britta Renner},
  journal={Psychological Science},
  year={2014},
  volume={25},
  pages={58 - 65}
}
Previous research suggests that approximately 40% to 50% of the population increase food consumption under stressful conditions. The prevailing view is that eating in response to stress is a type of maladaptive self-regulation. Past research has concentrated mainly on the negative effects of social stress on eating. We propose that positive social experiences may also modulate eating behavior. In the present study, participants were assigned to social-exclusion, neutral, and social-inclusion… 
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