The Borealis basin and the origin of the martian crustal dichotomy

@article{AndrewsHanna2008TheBB,
  title={The Borealis basin and the origin of the martian crustal dichotomy},
  author={Jeffrey C. Andrews‐Hanna and Maria T. Zuber and William Bruce Banerdt},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2008},
  volume={453},
  pages={1212-1215}
}
The most prominent feature on the surface of Mars is the near-hemispheric dichotomy between the southern highlands and northern lowlands. The root of this dichotomy is a change in crustal thickness along an apparently irregular boundary, which can be traced around the planet, except where it is presumably buried beneath the Tharsis volcanic rise. The isostatic compensation of these distinct provinces and the ancient population of impact craters buried beneath the young lowlands surface suggest… 
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