The Black Sea and the Slave Trade: The Role of Crimean Maritime Towns in the Trade in Slaves and Captives in the Fifteenth to Eighteenth Centuries

@article{Kizilov2005TheBS,
  title={The Black Sea and the Slave Trade: The Role of Crimean Maritime Towns in the Trade in Slaves and Captives in the Fifteenth to Eighteenth Centuries},
  author={Mikhail Kizilov},
  journal={International Journal of Maritime History},
  year={2005},
  volume={17},
  pages={211 - 235}
}
  • M. Kizilov
  • Published 1 June 2005
  • History
  • International Journal of Maritime History
Situated at the juncture of trade routes leading from Italy and Byzantium (later Turkey) to Poland, Russia and the East, the Crimea had always been attractive to international commerce, of which the slave trade was one of its most important components. The earliest data on the slave trade in the region dates back to antiquity. By the late Middle Ages this business was carried out mainly by Italians, with the Tatars as the most important purveyors of "live merchandise." Numerous published and… Expand
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