The Birth of Public Science in the English Provinces: Natural Philosophy in Derby, c. 1690-1760

@article{Elliott2000TheBO,
  title={The Birth of Public Science in the English Provinces: Natural Philosophy in Derby, c. 1690-1760},
  author={Paul A. Elliott},
  journal={Annals of Science},
  year={2000},
  volume={57},
  pages={100 - 61}
}
  • P. Elliott
  • Published 1 January 2000
  • History
  • Annals of Science
The industrial revolution and the scientific revolution of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries were two of the most important events in the whole of human history and the question of how these two relate to each other must therefore form one of the most vital of all inquiries in the history of science. As the industrial revolution began in England- and largely provincial England- the question of how scientific knowledge came to be disseminated to these regions forms a crucial part of such… 
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