The Birth of Information in the Brain: Edgar Adrian and the Vacuum Tube

@article{Garson2015TheBO,
  title={The Birth of Information in the Brain: Edgar Adrian and the Vacuum Tube},
  author={Justin Garson},
  journal={Science in Context},
  year={2015},
  volume={28},
  pages={31 - 52}
}
  • Justin Garson
  • Published 9 February 2015
  • Medicine, Sociology
  • Science in Context
Argument As historian Henning Schmidgen notes, the scientific study of the nervous system would have been “unthinkable” without the industrialization of communication in the 1830s. Historians have investigated extensively the way nerve physiologists have borrowed concepts and tools from the field of communications, particularly regarding the nineteenth-century work of figures like Helmholtz and in the American Cold War Era. The following focuses specifically on the interwar research of the… 
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