The Biosemiotic Concept of the Species

@article{Kull2016TheBC,
  title={The Biosemiotic Concept of the Species},
  author={K. Kull},
  journal={Biosemiotics},
  year={2016},
  volume={9},
  pages={61-71}
}
  • K. Kull
  • Published 2016
  • Biology
  • Biosemiotics
  • Any biological species of biparental organisms necessarily includes, and is fundamentally dependent on, sign processes between individuals. In this case, the natural category of the species is based on family resemblances (in the Wittgensteinian sense), which is why a species is not a natural kind. We describe the mechanism that generates the family resemblance. An individual recognition window and biparental reproduction almost suffice as conditions to produce species naturally. This is due to… CONTINUE READING
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