The Bionomics ofCoptera Haywardi(Ogloblin) (Hymenoptera: Diapriidae) and Other Pupal Parasitoids of Tephritid Fruit Flies (Diptera)☆

@article{Sivinski1998TheBO,
  title={The Bionomics ofCoptera Haywardi(Ogloblin) (Hymenoptera: Diapriidae) and Other Pupal Parasitoids of Tephritid Fruit Flies (Diptera)☆},
  author={John M. Sivinski and Kevina Vulinec and Ellen Menezes and Mart{\'i}n Aluja},
  journal={Biological Control},
  year={1998},
  volume={11},
  pages={193-202}
}
Abstract The endoparasitoidCoptera haywardi(Ogloblin) (Diapriidae) was discovered in Mexico attacking the pupae of the Mexican fruit fly,Anastrepha ludens(Loew). Typically, parasitoids of Diptera Cychlorrhapha pupae develop as ectoparasitoids and are generalists that attack hosts in a number of families. Aspects of the bionomics ofC. haywardiwere compared to those of two chalcidoid ectoparasitoids,Dirhinus himalayanusWestwood andSpalangia geminaBoucek.C. haywardideveloped in three genera of… Expand

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