The Bill-snap Reflex : a Feeding Mechanism in the American Wood Stork

@article{Kahl1963TheBR,
  title={The Bill-snap Reflex : a Feeding Mechanism in the American Wood Stork},
  author={M. Philip Kahl and Lance Peacock},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1963},
  volume={199},
  pages={505-506}
}
IN the course of field observations of the American wood stork (Mycteria americana) in Florida, the birds were seen to capture fish habitually from water so turbid or choked with vegetation that the use of visual cues was improbable. In such feeding behaviour, a stork typically inserts its partially open bill into the water, moves the bill slowly from side to side, and walks forward. Submerged vegetation is sometimes stirred with one foot and the wing on the same side is flashed open… Expand
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References

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Foot-stirring as a feeding habit of Wood Ibis and Other Birds
The feeding habit of the wood ibis most widely written about is the "muddying-the-water," in which the birds walk about in a shallow pond, stirring up the muddy bottom until the water is so mu'ddyExpand
Foraging Habits and Local Movements of the Wood Ibis in San Diego County, California
Published records and personal observations indicate that each summer a few Wood Ibises (Mycteria americana) visit southern California, particularly the Imperial Valley marshes, Imperial County, andExpand