The Bias Blind Spot: Perceptions of Bias in Self Versus Others

@article{Pronin2002TheBB,
  title={The Bias Blind Spot: Perceptions of Bias in Self Versus Others},
  author={Emily Pronin and Daniel Y. Lin and Lee D. Ross},
  journal={Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin},
  year={2002},
  volume={28},
  pages={369 - 381}
}
Three studies suggest that individuals see the existence and operation of cognitive and motivational biases much more in others than in themselves. Study 1 provides evidence from three surveys that people rate themselves as less subject to various biases than the “average American,” classmates in a seminar, and fellow airport travelers. Data from the third survey further suggest that such claims arise from the interplay among availability biases and self-enhancement motives. Participants in one… Expand

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