The Behavioralist Meets the Market: Measuring Social Preferences and Reputation Effects in Actual Transactions

@article{List2006TheBM,
  title={The Behavioralist Meets the Market: Measuring Social Preferences and Reputation Effects in Actual Transactions},
  author={John A. List},
  journal={Journal of Political Economy},
  year={2006},
  volume={114},
  pages={1 - 37}
}
  • J. List
  • Published 1 September 2005
  • Economics
  • Journal of Political Economy
The role of the market in mitigating and mediating various forms of behavior is perhaps the central issue facing behavioral economics today. This study designs a field experiment that is explicitly linked to a controlled laboratory experiment to examine whether, and to what extent, social preferences influence outcomes in actual market transactions. While agents drawn from a well‐functioning marketplace behave in accord with social preference models in tightly controlled laboratory experiments… 
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