The Beginnings of Brazilian Anthropology: Jesuits and Tupinamba Cannibalism

@article{Forsyth1983TheBO,
  title={The Beginnings of Brazilian Anthropology: Jesuits and Tupinamba Cannibalism},
  author={D. Forsyth},
  journal={Journal of Anthropological Research},
  year={1983},
  volume={39},
  pages={147 - 178}
}
  • D. Forsyth
  • Published 1983
  • History
  • Journal of Anthropological Research
Jesuit missionaries who lived and worked among the Tupian-speaking Indians of sixteenth-century coastal Brazil have provided valuable information on the customs and practices of these Indians. The contributions to Brazilian ethnography of such Jesuits as Nóbrega, Anchieta, Cardim, Soares, and others is illustrated by translations from their writings, most of which are unavailable in English. In particular, William Arens's thesis that Brazilian Indians really did not practice cannibalism as… Expand
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