The Bantu expansion revisited: a new analysis of Y chromosome variation in Central Western Africa

@article{Montano2011TheBE,
  title={The Bantu expansion revisited: a new analysis of Y chromosome variation in Central Western Africa},
  author={Valeria Montano and Gianmarco Ferri and Veronica Marcari and Chiara Batini and Okorie Okogbue Anyaele and Giovanni Destro‐Bisol and David Comas},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2011},
  volume={20}
}
The current distribution of Bantu languages is commonly considered to be a consequence of a relatively recent population expansion (3–5 kya) in Central Western Africa. While there is a substantial consensus regarding the centre of origin of Bantu languages (the Benue River Valley, between South East Nigeria and Western Cameroon), the identification of the area from where the population expansion actually started, the relation between the processes leading to the spread of languages and peoples… Expand
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