The Bacterial Cytoskeleton An Intermediate Filament-Like Function in Cell Shape

@article{Ausmees2003TheBC,
  title={The Bacterial Cytoskeleton An Intermediate Filament-Like Function in Cell Shape},
  author={Nora Ausmees and Jeffrey R. Kuhn and Christine Jacobs-Wagner},
  journal={Cell},
  year={2003},
  volume={115},
  pages={705-713}
}
Various cell shapes are encountered in the prokaryotic world, but how they are achieved is poorly understood. Intermediate filaments (IFs) of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton play an important role in cell shape in higher organisms. No such filaments have been found in prokaryotes. Here, we describe a bacterial equivalent to IF proteins, named crescentin, whose cytoskeletal function is required for the vibrioid and helical shapes of Caulobacter crescentus. Without crescentin, the cells adopt a… Expand

Paper Mentions

Intermediate Filament-Like Cytoskeleton of Caulobacter crescentus
  • N. Ausmees
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of Molecular Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • 2006
TLDR
The unexpected finding of an IF-like element in a bacterium raises several interesting questions concerning, for example, the molecular mechanisms whereby complex and asymmetric cell shapes are generated by different bacteria, or the functional and evolutionary relatedness of crescentin to animal IF proteins. Expand
Intermediate Filaments Supporting Cell Shape and Growth in Bacteria.
  • G. Kelemen
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Sub-cellular biochemistry
  • 2017
TLDR
The fascinating display of filamentous assemblies, including rope, striated cables and hexagonal laces together with the conditions required for their formation both in vitro and in vivo strongly resemble that of eukaryote IFs suggesting that these bacterial proteins are deservedly classified as part of the IF-family and that the current definition should be relaxed slightly to allow their inclusion. Expand
Bacterial intermediate filaments: in vivo assembly, organization, and dynamics of crescentin.
TLDR
It is demonstrated that crescentin also shares in vivo properties of assembly and dynamics with IF proteins by forming stable filamentous structures that continuously incorporate subunits along their length and that grow in a nonpolar fashion. Expand
Cytoskeletal elements in bacteria.
  • P. Graumann
  • Chemistry, Medicine
  • Annual review of microbiology
  • 2007
TLDR
The investigation of bacteria-specific cytoskeletal elements that confer various functions in cell morphology and during the cell cycle have been observed in prokaryotes, and the investigation of these elements will give fundamental information for all types of cells and can reveal the molecular mode of action of cytOSkeletal, filament-forming proteins. Expand
Intermediate filament-like proteins in bacteria and a cytoskeletal function in Streptomyces
TLDR
The bioinformatic and experimental data suggest that an IF‐like protein architecture is a versatile design that is generally present in bacteria and utilized to perform diverse cytoskeletal tasks. Expand
Control of Cell Morphogenesis in Bacteria Two Distinct Ways to Make a Rod-Shaped Cell
TLDR
A fluorescent derivative of the antibiotic vancomycin is used as a probe for nascent peptidoglycan synthesis in unfixed cells of various Gram-positive bacteria, providing insights into the diverse molecular strategies used by bacteria to control their cellular morphology, as well as suggesting ways in which these strategies may impact on growth rates and cell envelope structure. Expand
Dynamic gradients of an intermediate filament-like cytoskeleton are recruited by a polarity landmark during apical growth
TLDR
It is shown that FilP, a bacterial cytoskeletal protein related to metazoan intermediate filament (IF) proteins, can self-assemble into a regular network structure in vitro and in vivo and that a spatially restricted interaction between FilP and DivIVA, the main component of the Streptomyces polarisome complex, leads to formation of apical gradients of FilP in hyphae undergoing active tip extension. Expand
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TLDR
A novel gene, rodZ, required for the determination of rod shape in Escherichia coli is reported, which may mediate spatial information from cytoskeletal proteins in the cytoplasm to a peptidoglycan synthesis machinery in the periplasm. Expand
Bacterial cell curvature through mechanical control of cell growth
TLDR
The data argue for a model in which physical strain borne by the crescentin structure anisotropically alters the kinetics of cell wall insertion to produce curved growth, suggesting that bacteria may use the cytoskeleton for mechanical control of growth to alter morphology. Expand
Prokaryotic cytoskeletons: protein filaments organizing small cells
TLDR
The diverse ways that linear protein polymers can be used to organize other molecules and structures in bacteria and archaea are highlighted to highlight the diversity of prokaryotic cytoskeletons. Expand
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