The Award of the Copley Medal to Charles Darwin

@article{Bartholomew1976TheAO,
  title={The Award of the Copley Medal to Charles Darwin},
  author={Michael Bartholomew},
  journal={Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London},
  year={1976},
  volume={30},
  pages={209 - 218}
}
  • M. Bartholomew
  • Published 1976
  • History
  • Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London
Darwin was awarded the Royal Society’s highest award, the Copley Medal, at the anniversary meeting on 30 November 1864. The event is worth examining in some detail because first, there was a disagreement as to whether the Origin of species had been included in, or excluded from, the grounds on which the award of the medal had been made. The published letters of Darwin’s supporters give the impression that the President of the Society, General Sabine, behaved rather dishonourably by saying, in… 
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