• Corpus ID: 209688362

The Avian Enigma: “Hibernation” by Common Poorwills

@inproceedings{Christopher2004TheAE,
  title={The Avian Enigma: “Hibernation” by Common Poorwills},
  author={Christopher and P. and Woods},
  year={2004}
}
Common Poorwills, small nocturnal insectivorous birds found across western North America, are seemingly unique because of their alleged ability to remain torpid for extended periods during winter. We used temperaturesensitive radio transmitters to assess patterns of torpor use at sites in the Sonoran desert of southern Arizona. Poorwills used torpor extensively whenever ambient temperature (T a ) dropped below 10° C, and there was little evidence for thermoregulation when T a was above 5° C… 

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