The Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy position statement: summary of allergy prevention in children

@article{Prescott2005TheAS,
  title={The Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy position statement: summary of allergy prevention in children},
  author={Susan L. Prescott and Mimi L. K. Tang},
  journal={Medical Journal of Australia},
  year={2005},
  volume={182}
}
A family history of allergy and asthma identifies children at high risk of allergic disease. Dietary restrictions in pregnancy are not recommended. Avoiding inhalant allergens during pregnancy has not been shown to reduce allergic disease, and is not recommended. Breastfeeding should be recommended because of other beneficial effects, but if breast feeding is not possible, a hydrolysed formula is recommended (rather than conventional cow's milk formulas) in high‐risk infants only. Maternal… 
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TLDR
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Diet of lactating women and allergic reactions in their infants
TLDR
Current data do not support the use of maternal antigen-avoidance diets during lactation as a strategy to prevent childhood allergies, and Controlled trials are required to evaluate the efficacy of maternal dietary n−3 fatty acid interventions in preventing allergic disease in at-risk infants.
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TLDR
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