The Association between Mushroom Consumption and Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Community-Based Cross-Sectional Study in Singapore.

@article{Feng2019TheAB,
  title={The Association between Mushroom Consumption and Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Community-Based Cross-Sectional Study in Singapore.},
  author={Lei Feng and Irwin Kee-Mun Cheah and Maisie Mei-Xi Ng and Jialiang Li and Sue Mei Chan and Su Lin Lim and Rathi Mahendran and Ee Heok Kua and Barry Halliwell},
  journal={Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD},
  year={2019},
  volume={68 1},
  pages={
          197-203
        }
}
We examined the cross-sectional association between mushroom intake and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) using data from 663 participants aged 60 and above from the Diet and Healthy Aging (DaHA) study in Singapore. Compared with participants who consumed mushrooms less than once per week, participants who consumed mushrooms >2 portions per week had reduced odds of having MCI (odds ratio = 0.43, 95% CI 0.23-0.78, p = 0.006) and this association was independent of age, gender, education, cigarette… Expand
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