• Corpus ID: 202545562

The Arusha project : Accessible infertility care in developing countries – a reasonable option ?

@inproceedings{Willem2010TheAP,
  title={The Arusha project : Accessible infertility care in developing countries – a reasonable option ?},
  author={Willem and Ombelet and Rudi and Campo and Ren{\'e} and Frydman and Carin and Huyser and Geeta and Nargund and Hassan and Sallam and Frank and Van Balen and Jonathan and Van Blerkom},
  year={2010}
}
1. How can we reduce the stigma of infertility and childlessness in DC? 2. Does the value of children and the motive for parenthood differ between developed and developing countries, and if yes, what can we do about it? 3. Is it necessary and/or advisable to introduce accessable low-cost infertility services in DC? 4. Is it reasonable and feasible to incorporate infertility care in ‘Reproductive Health Care Centres’ and what will be the hurdles? 5. Which geographical areas should have priority… 

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