The Ardipithecus ramidus Skull and Its Implications for Hominid Origins

@article{Suwa2009TheAR,
  title={The Ardipithecus ramidus Skull and Its Implications for Hominid Origins},
  author={Gen Suwa and Berhane Abrha Asfaw and Reiko T. Kono and Daisuke Kubo and C. Owen Lovejoy and Tim D. White},
  journal={Science},
  year={2009},
  volume={326},
  pages={68 - 68e7}
}
The highly fragmented and distorted skull of the adult skeleton ARA-VP-6/500 includes most of the dentition and preserves substantial parts of the face, vault, and base. Anatomical comparisons and micro–computed tomography–based analysis of this and other remains reveal pre-Australopithecus hominid craniofacial morphology and structure. The Ardipithecus ramidus skull exhibits a small endocranial capacity (300 to 350 cubic centimeters), small cranial size relative to body size, considerable… 

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