The Arctic is burning like never before - and that's bad news for climate change.

@article{Witze2020TheAI,
  title={The Arctic is burning like never before - and that's bad news for climate change.},
  author={Alexandra Witze},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2020}
}
  • A. Witze
  • Published 10 September 2020
  • Environmental Science
  • Nature
Fires are releasing record levels of carbon dioxide, partly because they are burning ancient peatlands that have been a carbon sink. Fires are releasing record levels of carbon dioxide, partly because they are burning ancient peatlands. 

Lightning threatens permafrost

  • D. Finney
  • Environmental Science
    Nature Climate Change
  • 2021
Thawing Arctic permafrost, and release of its stored carbon, is a known amplifier of global warming. Now research suggests an increase in Arctic lightning could speed up the permafrost’s demise.

Up in smoke

Where there is smoke, there are radiative feedbacks. With wildfires becoming a growing problem in the Anthropocene, we need to better understand the influence of fire on the climate system.

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References

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Large stocks of peatland carbon and nitrogen are vulnerable to permafrost thaw

TLDR
This study compiles over 7,000 field observations to present a data-driven map of northern peatlands and their carbon and nitrogen stocks, and uses machine-learning techniques with extensive peat core data to create observation-based maps ofNorthern peatland C and N stocks and to assess their response to warming and permafrost thaw.

Assessment of increase in forest fire risk in Russia till the late 21st century based on scenario experiments with fifth-generation climate models

Proposed are the methods for assessing the number of days per month with the forest fire risk based on monthly mean values of air temperature, relative humidity, and the amount of precipitation.