The Aral Sea Disaster

@article{Micklin2007TheAS,
  title={The Aral Sea Disaster},
  author={Philip P. Micklin},
  journal={Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences},
  year={2007},
  volume={35},
  pages={47-72}
}
  • P. Micklin
  • Published 30 April 2007
  • Environmental Science
  • Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences
The Aral Sea is a huge terminal lake located among the deserts of Central Asia. Over the past 10 millennia, it has repeatedly filled and dried, owing both to natural and human forces. The most recent desiccation started in the early 1960s and owes overwhelmingly to the expansion of irrigation that has drained its two tributary rivers. Lake level has fallen 23 m, area shrunk 74%, volume decreased 90%, and salinity grew from 10 to more than 100g/l, causing negative ecological changes, including… 

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References

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The Aral Sea is a terminal lake amidst the deserts of Central Asia. Its size and water balance are fundamentally determined by river inflow and evaporation from its surface. Until the 1960s, the Aral

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The best ebooks about Creeping Environmental Problems And Sustainable Development In The Aral Sea Basin that you can get for free here by download this Creeping Environmental Problems And Sustainable