The Antihæmorrhagic Vitamin of the Chick.: Occurrence And Chemical Nature

@article{Dam1935TheAV,
  title={The Antih{\ae}morrhagic Vitamin of the Chick.: Occurrence And Chemical Nature},
  author={Henrik Dam},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1935},
  volume={135},
  pages={652-653}
}
  • H. Dam
  • Published 1 April 1935
  • Biology
  • Nature
IN earlier papers1,2 a new deficiency disease in chicks has been described which is characterised by a tendency to large hæmorrhages. It has been ascribed to the lack of a specific antihæmorrhagic factor which is different from vitamin C. More recent work has demonstrated that the factor in question is a fat-soluble vitamin occurring in hog liver fat, in hemp seed and certain vegetables, such as tomatoes and kale, and—to a less degree—in many cereals. Beef muscle, calf brain and beef lungs… 
Dietary Hæmorrhagic Disease in Chicks
A NUTRITIONAL disease of chicks characterised by subcutaneous, intramuscular and abdominal hæmorrhages, prolonged blood-clotting time and erosions of the gizzard lining has been described in detail
A Nutritional Deficiency causing Gizzard Erosions in Chicks
TLDR
Gizzard erosion is investigated with the object of determining whether it is a true portion of the hæmorrhagic syndrome or a separate disease not caused by deficiency of the antihæmor Rhagic vitamin.
The Anti-hemorrhagic Vitamin
TLDR
Preliminary indications of the existence of a dietary disease in which chickens suffer from hemorrhagic tendencies and delayed blood clotting may be seen in a number of papers describing results obtained in experiments dealing with various phases of poultry nutrition.
The development of vitamin K and its clinical uses in the neonatal period
TLDR
It was not until seven years later that Schonheyder (1936), also of the University of Copenhagen staff, demonstrated a deficiency of prothrombin in the plasma of chicks on a vitamin K-free diet, and the addition of vitamin K to their diet was followed not only by a rapid cure of their haemorrhagic tendency but also by a coincident rise of their plasma prothrome to a normal value.
The Alleged Intoxication Factor in Fish Meal
Abstract IT HAS been stated by Cook and Scott (1935a, b) that a condition, the main symptoms of which were (1) severe anemia, (2) increased clotting time of blood, (3) distortion of the blood picture
VOLUME 2, NUMBER 4
TLDR
Work in the author’s laboratory has the potential of generating knowledge of importance to medical sciences by providing information about diluents useful for cold-storage of cells, about enzymes whose activities may be applicable to studies of human tissues, and about mitochondria.
Vitamin K metabolism.
TLDR
Improvements in the assay method based on the restoration of normal clotting time in hemorrhagic chicks led to the proposal that a lack of vitamin K caused a deficiency in prothrombin activity and that vitamin K might be some kind of coenzyme or prosthetic group required for active prothROMbin (Schoenheyder, 1936).
OTHER FACTORS: LESS WELL KNOWN VITAMINS
TLDR
The expanse of unexplored fields in the domain of nutrition is well illustrated by the discovery of Trager and co-workers that a factor essential for growth of mosquito larvae is present in normal human urine but deficient in that of pernicious anemia patients.
The Relationship of Vitamin K to Mortality from Cecal Coccidiosis
TLDR
Experiments were designed to study the possibility of reducing mortality from cecal coccidiosis by the addition of MSB to a vitamin K low diet.
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References

SHOWING 1-2 OF 2 REFERENCES
Hæmorrhages in Chicks Reared on Artificial Diets: a New Deficiency Disease
TLDR
It was observed that the animals often exhibited, extensive internal haemorrhages when they were fed a ration consisting of vitamin A-free casein 20, Marmite 10, salt mixture 4·5, starch 65·5 and varying amounts of cod liver oil concentrates.
A deficiency disease in chicks resembling scurvy.