The Anthropocene: a new epoch of geological time?

@article{Zalasiewicz2011TheAA,
  title={The Anthropocene: a new epoch of geological time?},
  author={J. Zalasiewicz and Mark Williams and A. Haywood and M. Ellis},
  journal={Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences},
  year={2011},
  volume={369},
  pages={835 - 841}
}
  • J. Zalasiewicz, Mark Williams, +1 author M. Ellis
  • Published 2011
  • Medicine, Geography, Biology
  • Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences
Anthropogenic changes to the Earth’s climate, land, oceans and biosphere are now so great and so rapid that the concept of a new geological epoch defined by the action of humans, the Anthropocene, is widely and seriously debated. Questions of the scale, magnitude and significance of this environmental change, particularly in the context of the Earth’s geological history, provide the basis for this Theme Issue. The Anthropocene, on current evidence, seems to show global change consistent with… Expand
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