The Ancient Chemistry of Avoiding Risks of Predation and Disease

@article{Yao2009TheAC,
  title={The Ancient Chemistry of Avoiding Risks of Predation and Disease},
  author={Mingcan Yao and Jack M. Rosenfeld and Stephen R. Attridge and Shabnam Sidhu and Vadim Aksenov and C D Rollo},
  journal={Evolutionary Biology},
  year={2009},
  volume={36},
  pages={267-281}
}
Illness, death, and costs of immunity and injury strongly select for avoidance of predators or contagion. [...] Key Result Isopods were repelled by crushed conspecifics (blood), intact corpses, and alcohol extracts of bodies. As predicted, the repellent fraction contained oleic and linoleic acids and authentic standards repelled several isopod species. We further predicted a priori that social caterpillars (lacking known dispersants) would be repelled by their own body fluids and unsaturated fatty acids.Expand

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