The Anatomy of Anosognosia for Hemiplegia: A Meta-Analysis

@article{Pia2004TheAO,
  title={The Anatomy of Anosognosia for Hemiplegia: A Meta-Analysis},
  author={Lorenzo Pia and Marco Neppi-Modona and Raffaella Ricci and Anna Berti},
  journal={Cortex},
  year={2004},
  volume={40},
  pages={367-377}
}

Anosognosia for hemiplegia after stroke is a multifaceted phenomenon: a systematic review of the literature.

The need for a multidimensional assessment procedure for anosognosia following stroke is highlighted and some potentially productive directions for future research about unawareness of illness are suggested.

Anosognosia for hemiplegia: a clinical-anatomical prospective study.

It is suggested that anosognosia for hemiplegia is likely to reflect a multi-component disorder due to lesions affecting a distributed set of brain regions, which can lead to several co-existing deficits in sensation, attention, interoceptive bodily representations, motor programming, error monitoring, memory and even affective processing.

Somatoparaphrenia: a body delusion. A review of the neuropsychological literature

Somatoparaphrenia is often brought about by extensive right-sided lesions, but patients with posterior (parietal-temporal), and insular damage are on record, as well as a few patients with subcortical lesions.

Anosognosia for hemiplegia: The contributory role of right inferior frontal gyrus.

The current study findings provide preliminary support for unique involvement of the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), pars orbitalis (BA 47) in AHP, and suggest that frontal operculum may play a key role in awareness of limb functioning.

Blissfully unaware: Anosognosia and anosodiaphoria after acquired brain injury

  • P. Gasquoine
  • Psychology, Medicine
    Neuropsychological rehabilitation
  • 2016
All manifestations of anosognosia are considered as a unitary phenomenon with differing clinical characteristics dictated by variability in linked cognitive impairments, and anosodiaphoria is considered as an associated symptom, resulting from the same psychological and neuropathological factors.

Multiple Network Disconnection in Anosognosia for Hemiplegia

Recent studies of disconnection demonstrating that AHP is not limited to dysfunction of motor systems, but involves a much wider set of large-scale cortical networks are confirmed.

Anosognosia and denial after right hemisphere stroke

This chapter will focus on anosognosia associated with right hemisphere stroke, that is mainly anos Cognosia for hemiplegia, and/or hemianopia.

Correlation between anosognosia after stroke and level of education

This study aims to investigate AHP in all patients after a first stroke and to assess a possible correlation between the level of awareness and education and the pathogenesis of this phenomenon is widely debated.
...

References

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The pathogenesis of anosognosia for hemiplegia may involve failure to discover paralysis because proprioceptive mechanisms that ordinarily inform an individual about the position and movement of limbs are damaged, and the patient, because of additional cognitive defects, lacks the capacity to make the necessary observations and inferences to diagnose the paralysis.

Dissociation of anosognosia for hemiplegia and aphasia during left-hemisphere anesthesia

V Videotapes of 54 patients with medically intractable seizures who had selective barbiturate anesthesia as part of their evaluation for seizure surgery were assessed for anosognosia of hemiplegia and aphasia after hemispheric anesthesia had worn off, providing support for the postulate that awareness of dysfunction is mediated by a modular system.

Localization of lesion in denial of hemiplegia after acute stroke.

This investigation focuses on denial of hemiplegia, without concomitant delusions, after cerebrovascular accident (CVA), and demonstrates that 26 of 30 denial patients had unilateral right-sided lesions and that this group showed a significantly higher incidence of lesions in deep white matter and the basal ganglia.

Anosognosia during Wada testing

The results suggest that anosognosia is more often associated with right rather than left-hemisphere dysfunction and that it cannot be attributed to either psychological denial or the emotional changes associated with hemispheric dysfunction.

Denial of hemiplegia: an investigation into the theories of causation.

Patients with denial of hemiplegia following acute CVA have significantly more white matter involvement, particularly the corona radiata, than those with neglect and there was also a trend that patients with denial are more likely to have lesions in the caudate.

GERSTMANN SYNDROME: FINGER AGNOSIA, AGRAPHIA, CONFUSION OF RIGHT AND LEFT AND ACALCULIA: COMPARISON OF THIS SYNDROME WITH DISTURBANCE OF BODY SCHEME RESULTING FROM LESIONS OF THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE BRAIN

"Body scheme" or "body pattern" is the concept which a person has of the structure of his own body or that of another and the relations of the parts of the body to each other. This body scheme may be

PROBLEM OF IMPERCEPTION OF DISEASE AND OF IMPAIRED BODY TERRITORIES WITH ORGANIC LESIONS RELATION TO BODY SCHEME AND ITS DISORDERS

The phenomenon of nonperception of disease has been observed in patients with cortical blindness from bilateral lesion of the occipital lobe and in persons with visual field defects from cerebral hemiplegia.

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Anosognosia for Motor Impairment and Dissociations with Patients' Evaluation of the Disorder: Theoretical Considerations

It is concluded that investigations of anosognosia should take account of the patient's personal report and that this is crucial both for disclosing implicit mental content and for interpreting the underlying structure of conscious mental processes.

Anosognosia during intracarotid barbiturate anesthesia

Observations provide insight into the neuropsychological basis of anosognosia for hemiparesis (AHP), arguing against earlier explanations based upon psychological denial, global cognitive disturbance, or emotional indifference.
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