The Airtraq® as a rescue airway device following failed direct laryngoscopy: a case series

@article{Maharaj2007TheAA,
  title={The Airtraq{\textregistered} as a rescue airway device following failed direct laryngoscopy: a case series},
  author={C. Maharaj and J. Costello and J. Mcdonnell and B. Harte and J. Laffey},
  journal={Anaesthesia},
  year={2007},
  volume={62}
}
We report the successful use of the Airtraq® as a rescue device following failed direct laryngoscopy, in patients deemed at increased risk for difficult tracheal intubation. In a series of seven patients, repeated attempts at direct laryngoscopy with the Macintosh blade, and the use of manoeuvres to aid intubation, such as the gum elastic bougie placement, were unsuccessful. In contrast, with the Airtraq® device, each patient's trachea was successfully intubated on the first attempt. This… Expand
Use of the Airtraq as the primary technique to manage anticipated difficult airway: a report of three cases.
TLDR
The use of this device as the primary technique to manage the airway of three patients with a previous history of difficult intubation related to difficult laryngoscopy is presented. Expand
Awake tracheal intubation using the Airtraq® laryngoscope: a case series
TLDR
It is considered that the AL can be used effectively to accomplish an awake intubation in patients with a suspected or known difficult airway and may be a useful alternative where other methods for awakeintubation have failed or are not available. Expand
The Channelled Airtraq® as a Rescue Device Following Failed Expected Difficult Intubation with an Angulated Video Laryngoscope.
  • Z. Arslan
  • Medicine
  • Turkish journal of anaesthesiology and reanimation
  • 2018
TLDR
Two expected difficult intubation cases that failed with an angulated-type video laryngoscope (C-MAC D-blade) were rescued with a channelled-type Airtraq® device and were able to intubate the tracheas at the first attempt. Expand
Difficult laryngoscopy improved with a Miller blade
TLDR
The authors comment that ‘almost all the oropharyngeal injuries were related to difficult pharyngeAL insertion of the Airtraq laryngoscope using the standard insertion technique’, which has been favourably evaluated in a number of patient studies. Expand
The Airtraq laryngoscope for emergency tracheal intubation without interruption of chest compression.
TLDR
The authors report a case of a 61-year-old man presented to their Medical Emergency Team for inhospital cardiac arrest in radiology suite, and introduction of video laryngoscopes might have benefits in these situations. Expand
Evaluation of the Airtraq video laryngoscope as a rescue device after difficult direct laryngoscopy.
TLDR
It is confirmed that the Airtraq is a reliable video laryngoscope as a rescue device in cases of difficult laryngeal view with direct lARYngoscopy, and tracheal intubation using the AIRTraq was effective, simple and safe in patients with difficult laryNGoscopy. Expand
The Airtraq® laryngoscope for placement of double-lumen endobronchial tube
TLDR
The successful placement of double-lumen endobronchial tube placement with the aid of the Airtraq laryngoscope in surgical patients is reported. Expand
AIRTRAQ8 OPTICAL LARYNGOSCOPE FOR TRACHEAL INTUBATION IN A PATIENT WITH AN UNCOMMON GIANT LIPOMA ON THE POSTERIOR ASPECT OF NECK AND ADDITIONAL RISK FACTORS OF ANTICIPATED DIFFICULT AIRWAY: A CASE REPORT.
TLDR
A case of uncommon giant lipoma in the posterior aspect of the neck, intubated successfully in the semi-lateral position with the use of Airtraq, a new single use device that permits an indirect view of the glottis without the need to achieve a direct line of sight by conventional use of the 'sniffing position'. Expand
More maneuvers to facilitate endotracheal intubation using the Airtraq® laryngoscope in children with difficult airways
TLDR
The AOL provides a high-grade, indirect, close proximity view of the glottis without the need for alignment of the oral, pharyngeal, and laryngeAL axes and seems suitable for difficult airways in small children. Expand
Evaluation of the Airtraq® and Macintosh laryngoscopes in patients at increased risk for difficult tracheal intubation*
TLDR
The Airtraq®, a novel single use indirect laryngoscope, has demonstrated promise in the normal and simulated difficult airway and reduced the duration of intubation attempts and the need for additional manoeuvres in patients at increased risk for difficult tracheal intubations in a randomised, controlled clinical trial. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 15 REFERENCES
A comparison of tracheal intubation using the Airtraq® or the Macintosh laryngoscope in routine airway management: a randomised, controlled clinical trial
TLDR
The utility of the Airtraq® laryngoscope for tracheal intubation in low risk patients demonstrated in a randomised, controlled clinical trial is demonstrated. Expand
Tracheal intubation by inexperienced medical residents using the Airtraq and Macintosh laryngoscopes--a manikin study.
TLDR
The Airtraq laryngoscope may constitute a superior device for use by personnel infrequently required to perform tracheal intubation for medical residents with little prior airway management experience. Expand
Retention of tracheal intubation skills by novice personnel: a comparison of the Airtraq® and Macintosh laryngoscopes *
TLDR
The Airtraq® continued to provide better intubating conditions, resulting in greater success of intubation, with fewer optimisation manoeuvres required, and reduced potential for dental trauma, particularly in the difficult laryngoscopy scenarios. Expand
Evaluation of intubation using the Airtraq® or Macintosh laryngoscope by anaesthetists in easy and simulated difficult laryngoscopy – a manikin study *
TLDR
In the simulated difficult laryngoscopy scenarios, the Airtraq® was more successful in achieving tracheal intubation, required less time to intubate successfully, caused less dental trauma, and was considered by the anaesthetists to be easier to use. Expand
Learning and performance of tracheal intubation by novice personnel: a comparison of the Airtraq® and Macintosh laryngoscope
TLDR
The Airtraq appears to be a superior device for novice personnel to acquire the skills of tracheal intubation, particularly in the difficult laryngoscopy scenarios. Expand
Emergency Tracheal Intubation: Complications Associated with Repeated Laryngoscopic Attempts
  • T. Mort
  • Medicine
  • Anesthesia and analgesia
  • 2004
TLDR
Data support the recommendation of the ASA Task Force on the Management of the Difficult Airway to limit laryngoscopic attempts to three in lieu of the considerable patient injury that may occur and confirm the number of larygoscopic attempts is associated with the incidence of airway and hemodynamic adverse events. Expand
Esophageal intubation with indirect clinical tests during emergency tracheal intubation: a report on patient morbidity.
  • T. Mort
  • Medicine
  • Journal of clinical anesthesia
  • 2005
TLDR
It is suggested that EI during emergency intubation, when detected by standard indirect clinical tests based on physical examination, contributes significantly to mild and severe hypoxemia, regurgitation, aspiration, bradycardia, cardiac dysrhythmias, and cardiac arrest. Expand
Difficult Airway Society guidelines for management of the unanticipated difficult intubation
Problems with tracheal intubation are infrequent but are the most common cause of anaesthetic death or brain damage. The clinical situation is not always managed well. The Difficult Airway SocietyExpand
The Intubation Difficulty Scale (IDS): Proposal and Evaluation of a New Score Characterizing the Complexity of Endotracheal Intubation
TLDR
A quantitative score that can be used to evaluate intubating conditions and techniques with the aim of determining the relative values predictive factors of intubation difficulty and of the techniques used to decrease such difficulties is developed. Expand
A response to ‘Difficult Airway Society guidelines for management of the unanticipated difficult intubation’, Henderson JJ, Popat MT, Latto IP and Pearce AC, Anaesthesia 2004; 59: 675–94
TLDR
It is shown that during surgical procedures identical to those described here, S100b levels increases are consistent with early damage to the cerebral vasculature, and was evident only when non-specific binding to non-S100b protein was taken into account and subtracted from the readout. Expand
...
1
2
...