The Adenylate Cyclase Toxins

@article{Ahuja2004TheAC,
  title={The Adenylate Cyclase Toxins},
  author={Nidhi Ahuja and Praveen Kumar and Rakesh Bhatnagar},
  journal={Critical Reviews in Microbiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={30},
  pages={187 - 196}
}
Cyclic AMP is a ubiquitous messenger that integrates many processes of the cell. Diverse families of adenylate cyclases and phosphodiesterases stringently regulate the intracellular concentration of cAMP. Any alteration in the cytosolic concentration of cAMP has a profound effect on the various processes of the cell. Disruption of these cellular processes in vivo is often the most critical event in the pathogenesis of infectious diseases for animals and humans. Many pathogenic bacteria secrete… 
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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Cyclic AMP Signaling in Mycobacteria.
TLDR
The many roles of cAMP in mycobacteria are discussed and what is known about the factors that contribute to production, destruction, and utilization of this important signal molecule are reviewed.
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