The Accretion, Composition and Early Differentiation of Mars

@article{Halliday2001TheAC,
  title={The Accretion, Composition and Early Differentiation of Mars},
  author={A. Halliday and H. W{\"a}nke and J. Birck and R. Clayton},
  journal={Space Science Reviews},
  year={2001},
  volume={96},
  pages={197-230}
}
The early development of Mars is of enormous interest, not just in its own right, but also because it provides unique insights into the earliest history of the Earth, a planet whose origins have been all but obliterated. Mars is not as depleted in moderately volatile elements as are other terrestrial planets. Judging by the data for Martian meteorites it has Rb/Sr ≈ 0.07 and K/U ≈ 19,000, both of which are roughly twice as high as the values for the Earth. The mantle of Mars is also twice as… Expand
Core Formation and Mantle Differentiation on Mars
The Origin and Earliest History of the Earth
The composition of Mars.
The bulk composition of Mars
2.10 – Mars
The rates of accretion, core formation and volatile loss in the early Solar System
4. Building of a Habitable Planet
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