The 70 kDa subunit of replication protein A is required for the G1/S and intra-S DNA damage checkpoints in budding yeast.

@article{Longhese1996The7K,
  title={The 70 kDa subunit of replication protein A is required for the G1/S and intra-S DNA damage checkpoints in budding yeast.},
  author={Maria Pia Longhese and H Neecke and Vera Paciotti and Giovanna Lucchini and Paolo Plevani},
  journal={Nucleic acids research},
  year={1996},
  volume={24 18},
  pages={
          3533-7
        }
}
The rfa1-M2 and rfa1-M4 Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants, which are altered in the 70 kDa subunit of replication protein A (RPA) and sensitive to UV and methyl methane sulfonate (MMS), have been analyzed for possible checkpoint defects. The G1/S and intra-S DNA damage checkpoints are defective in the rfa1-M2 mutant, since rfa1-M2 cells fail to properly delay cell cycle progression in response to UV irradiation in G1 and MMS treatment during S phase. Conversely, the G2/M DNA damage checkpoint… 

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