The 35th Sir Frederick Bartlett Lecture: Eye movements and attention in reading, scene perception, and visual search

@article{Rayner2009The3S,
  title={The 35th Sir Frederick Bartlett Lecture: Eye movements and attention in reading, scene perception, and visual search},
  author={Keith Rayner},
  journal={Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology},
  year={2009},
  volume={62},
  pages={1457 - 1506}
}
  • K. Rayner
  • Published 25 June 2009
  • Psychology, Art
  • Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology
Eye movements are now widely used to investigate cognitive processes during reading, scene perception, and visual search. In this article, research on the following topics is reviewed with respect to reading: (a) the perceptual span (or span of effective vision), (b) preview benefit, (c) eye movement control, and (d) models of eye movements. Related issues with respect to eye movements during scene perception and visual search are also reviewed. It is argued that research on eye movements… 

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