The 2019–2020 Novel Coronavirus (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2) Pandemic: A Joint American College of Academic International Medicine-World Academic Council of Emergency Medicine Multidisciplinary COVID-19 Working Group Consensus Paper

@article{Stawicki2020The2N,
  title={The 2019–2020 Novel Coronavirus (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2) Pandemic: A Joint American College of Academic International Medicine-World Academic Council of Emergency Medicine Multidisciplinary COVID-19 Working Group Consensus Paper},
  author={Stanislaw P. A. Stawicki and Rebecca Jeanmonod and Andrew C. Miller and Lorenzo Paladino and David Foster Gaieski and Anna Q Yaffee and Annelies De Wulf and Joydeep Grover and Thomas John Papadimos and Christina M. Bloem and Sagar C. Galwankar and Vivek Singh Chauhan and Michael S. Firstenberg and Salvatore Di Somma and Donald Jeanmonod and Sona M. Garg and Veronica Theresa Tucci and Harry L Anderson and Lateef Fatimah and Tamara Jean Worlton and Siddharth Pramod Dubhashi and Krystal Glaze and Sagar Sinha and Ijeoma Nnodim Opara and Vikas Yellapu and Dhanashree S. Kelkar and Ayman El-Menyar and Vimal Krishnan and Saddikuti Venkataramanaiah and Yan Leyfman and Hassan Saoud Al Thani and Prabath WB Nanayakkara and Sudip Nanda and Eric Cio{\`e}‐Pe{\~n}a and Indrani Sardesai and S. Chandra and Aruna Munasinghe and Vibha Dutta and Silvana Teixeira Dal Ponte and Ricardo Izurieta and Juan Antonio Zaragoza Asensio and Manish Garg},
  journal={Journal of Global Infectious Diseases},
  year={2020},
  volume={12},
  pages={47 - 93}
}
What started as a cluster of patients with a mysterious respiratory illness in Wuhan, China, in December 2019, was later determined to be coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The pathogen severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), a novel Betacoronavirus, was subsequently isolated as the causative agent. SARS-CoV-2 is transmitted by respiratory droplets and fomites and presents clinically with fever, fatigue, myalgias, conjunctivitis, anosmia, dysgeusia, sore throat, nasal… 
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